Cool weather comfort

Dress: DIY from Colette Moneta pattern

Top: Tirelli

Tights: Sonse

Shoes: Comfortview

There’s something about winter that makes me crave comfort. Also summer. And spring. And autumn, I guess.

This layered outfit is – to the surprise of no one, I’m sure – a Very Comfortable Outfit. It’s snuggly and warm, and shapeless (but, like, the good kind of shapeless), and it’s basically been my unofficial uniform since the weather got cold.

I’ve been living in my Sonsee opaque tights rather than trousers this year. I’ve blogged about my undying love for Sonsee before. They’re a wonderful, local company founded in 2013 by the very lovely Vanessa, and since then they’ve gone from strength to strength. The success of Sonsee is in no small part down to the fact that their tights are – hands down – the most comfortable, long-wearing, stretchy tights I’ve ever, ever tried (and trust me: I’ve tried a lot.) You can read my original review here – It’s worth clicking through just to see me fitting both legs into one side of the tights… Sonsee is really stretchy, guys – and I just want to let you know: That pair of tights I’m wearing in that photo from 2013? I’m still wearing them.

In 2015 Vanessa appeared on the first Australian episode of Shark Tank, and won the support of entrepreneur Naomi Simson. It’s a partnership that’s allowed Sonsee to expand their product range into intimates and activewear, which allows me to live in my Sonsee tights in winter, and my Sonsee anti-chafing shorts in summer.

They’ve also had a bit of a brand refresh, and I’m really liking the elegant new packaging. Online orders come wrapped up like a present in a shiny gift box, which is a nice little addition for shoppers (plus you can save $10 off your first order by signing up to their mailing list).

Meanwhile. Have you ever just blown off an unfamiliar shop because you were sure they’d either be too expensive, or too small in size? It turns out I’ve been doing that with Tirelli, which has a fairly schmick and intimidating-looking shopfront in Melbourne Central. The windows are full of the kind of layered, architectural designs that I’ve been loving lately, but I was so sure their largest size would be a 12, and their prices would have an extra 0 at the end of them, that I’ve never been brave enough to go inside.

A couple of weeks ago I saw this reversible knit in the window, and thought maybe I’d just have a tiny squiz. I ended up being pleasantly surprised – Tirelli goes up to a size XXL, which is supposedly a 16, but the shapes and cuts actually work fine for curvier bodies. It reminds me a little of the kind of fashion coming out of Universal Standard, Elvi and Coverstory, and oh man: I’d love to see more of it in the shops, because that kind of voluminous stuff either works, or it really doesn’t, and you never know unless you try it on.

Necklace: FoxtailBoutique

Finally, feast your eyes and your fidgety fingers on my current favourite piece of jewellery. This faceted crystal spinner necklace was a self-gift from Etsy, and I adore it. The crystal spins freely with a little nudge, and I find myself twiddling with it non-stop whenever I wear it. It’s basically a classy, stylish, wearable fidget spinner.

 

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Nebulous

Frocks and Frou Frou Frocks and Frou Frou Frocks and Frou Frou Dress: DIY from Colette “Myrtle” pattern and Spoonflower Fabric

Cardigan: Eliza Parker

Belt: Closet Confessions

Shoes: Comfortview

My first fabric order with Spoonflower was in 2012, when I bought an amazing silk/cotton fabric printed with the image of a star forming region and turned it into a Colette Macaron dress. It was pretty quick to develop an addiction to the online fabric company which has a plethora of extraordinary printed fabrics (and the capacity to design and upload your own!)

My first Spacedress is long gone, but with stars and star-prints looking like one of the major trends this season (hurrah!) I thought maybe it was time to whip up a new one.

I chose the performance knit fabric, which at US$24 a yard certainly isn’t the cheapest dress fabric out there, but I’ve worked with it before and found it to have exceptional colour quality, wearability and drape. It’s a 100% polyester knit with a bit of a swimsuity sheen to it, and it has “moisture management” which would explain why even on hot days I don’t get sweaty in it. It has a bit of weight, and only about 25% stretch which means it holds its shape well and doesn’t bag out.

I was going to go for the same print as last time – the Star Forming Regions – but when I plugged in the number of yards I needed (I would definitely recommend this step if you’re buying from Spoonflower) I realised the fabric would end up with tiles as the pattern repeated. Instead I opted for this amazing image of the Carina Nebula which at 85×58″ in size would be big enough for me to make my favourite Myrtle sewing project without any visible repeats.

Frocks and Frou FrouThere’s a fairly big differentiation in the colours of the Carina Nebula. From deep blues to pinks and golds and deepening to purple and red in the centre.

I picked the pinks and blues for the front, and kept the deeper and darker colours for the back.

Frocks and Frou FrouAnd then, because it was freaking cold, I covered the lot up with a long draped cardigan, and added my bow belt from Closet Confessions and my sparkly galaxy necklace which is impossible to photograph so you’ll just have to take my word for it that in person it’s the prettiest sparkliest thing you’ve ever seen.

Frocks and Frou FrouThis is the fifth Myrtle dress that I’ve made, so I’m definitely getting my money’s worth with the dress pattern. It’s such a great one for beginner sewers, because it doesn’t have any tricky zippers or sleeves, the waistband is elasticised, and the draped neckline and knit fabric is very forgiving for people who aren’t confident about tweaking patterns for full-bust adjustments, or sway-back adjustments.

Frocks and Frou Frou - Myrtle Dress 5 ways