Frocks and Frou Frou Frocks and Frou Frou Frocks and Frou Frou Dress: DIY from Colette “Myrtle” pattern and Spoonflower Fabric

Cardigan: Eliza Parker

Belt: Closet Confessions

Shoes: Comfortview

My first fabric order with Spoonflower was in 2012, when I bought an amazing silk/cotton fabric printed with the image of a star forming region and turned it into a Colette Macaron dress. It was pretty quick to develop an addiction to the online fabric company which has a plethora of extraordinary printed fabrics (and the capacity to design and upload your own!)

My first Spacedress is long gone, but with stars and star-prints looking like one of the major trends this season (hurrah!) I thought maybe it was time to whip up a new one.

I chose the performance knit fabric, which at US$24 a yard certainly isn’t the cheapest dress fabric out there, but I’ve worked with it before and found it to have exceptional colour quality, wearability and drape. It’s a 100% polyester knit with a bit of a swimsuity sheen to it, and it has “moisture management” which would explain why even on hot days I don’t get sweaty in it. It has a bit of weight, and only about 25% stretch which means it holds its shape well and doesn’t bag out.

I was going to go for the same print as last time – the Star Forming Regions – but when I plugged in the number of yards I needed (I would definitely recommend this step if you’re buying from Spoonflower) I realised the fabric would end up with tiles as the pattern repeated. Instead I opted for this amazing image of the Carina Nebula which at 85×58″ in size would be big enough for me to make my favourite Myrtle sewing project without any visible repeats.

Frocks and Frou FrouThere’s a fairly big differentiation in the colours of the Carina Nebula. From deep blues to pinks and golds and deepening to purple and red in the centre.

I picked the pinks and blues for the front, and kept the deeper and darker colours for the back.

Frocks and Frou FrouAnd then, because it was freaking cold, I covered the lot up with a long draped cardigan, and added my bow belt from Closet Confessions and my sparkly galaxy necklace which is impossible to photograph so you’ll just have to take my word for it that in person it’s the prettiest sparkliest thing you’ve ever seen.

Frocks and Frou FrouThis is the fifth Myrtle dress that I’ve made, so I’m definitely getting my money’s worth with the dress pattern. It’s such a great one for beginner sewers, because it doesn’t have any tricky zippers or sleeves, the waistband is elasticised, and the draped neckline and knit fabric is very forgiving for people who aren’t confident about tweaking patterns for full-bust adjustments, or sway-back adjustments.

Frocks and Frou Frou - Myrtle Dress 5 ways

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Frocks and Frou FrouFrocks and Frou FrouTop: DIY

Skirt: Sussan

Shoes: Chie Mihara

So, a week or so ago the BF and I were lying in bed (not doing anything, so you can just get that out of your mind) when *CRACK* the whole thing collapsed out from under us. A knot in the wood had caused a weakness in one of the beams and the whole thing was irretrievable. So the bed was broken (boo!) which meant getting a new one (yay!) but the one that we liked didn’t come with the big cushions for the headboard (boo!) so I had to go to Spotlight to try and find something similar (yay!).

Which is a very roundabout way of telling you that I found some awesome fabric that reminds me of the clouds in a dawn sky, and I thought I’d buy it and using my well-fitting Finki top as a template make another boxy t-shirt.

It is, figuratively speaking, a copy-paste job (hence the blog title) so you don’t need a pattern, you just need a top that fits well, and doesn’t have any tricky seaming. The Finki tee is a perfect examples because it doesn’t even have separate sleeves. Front and back are both just one piece of fabric.

So – to start you need to lay your t-shirt out on your fabric: If you’re using a fabric with a directional print don’t forget you’ll need to cut your yardage in half and lay it reverse-side up behind the first piece, or you’ll end up with half your top upside down:Frocks and Frou Frou 1┬áPin your tee to the fabric, then cut around it, adding a cm or two for seams.

Frocks and Frou Frou 2

For the lower neckline at the front you should be able to make the shape out with your fingers. Trace the shape with a fabric pencil, or just with pins.

On just one piece cut out the front neckline – don’t forget to add your seam allowance!

Frocks and Frou Frou 3If, hypothetically, you had bought more than one pieces of fabric to make into t-shirts, so would be the time to use the two pieces of your new tee-shirt as a template. Hypothetically. Ahem. So. If you’ve got an overlocker everything just got a whole heap easier for you than the rest of us. But then, if you have an overlocker you probably are a much more experienced sewer than I am, so you’re not even reading this part anyway because this tutorial is way below your skill set.

You want to finish the neckline of your top first. Just fold the curve down, pin it, and sew it. I use a double-needle because I think it gives a cleaner line on knit fabrics, but you could just finish the edge with a zigzag, then turn the edge over and finish the line with a straight stitch. Do both pieces, front and back:

frocks and frou frou 4 Right sides together pin the two pieces at the shoulder, then down both sides. Swap your double needle back for a single and sew the two pieces together where you’ve pinned.

Frocks and Frou FrouNow all you’ve got left to do is finish the armholes and the hem. I did this with a double needle again. Because: Neat.

Frocks and Frou FrouFrocks and Frou Frou